The Saturday Collapse

By Deborah Atherton

Saturday Collapse

Whether we work at full-time jobs, as I do, or run our own businesses, as Leslie does, we are likely to be running at full-steam Monday through Friday attempting to pay our bills, all the while telling ourselves how much work we will get done on our creative projects on the weekend. We look forward to it; we plan for it; we schedule it.

And then Saturday comes. And before us lie all the weekend chores we don’t have time for during the work week, from laundry and grocery shopping to dry cleaning and buying a new electric drill at Home Depot. Plus all the bill-paying and newspaper/blog reading that couldn’t get done Monday through Friday. And the trip to the gym you are really overdue for. Not to mention the frantic emails from work or clients that mean you don’t really have the day of at all.

And you don’t want to do any of it. Not the writing or painting or photography. Not the laundry or dry cleaning or big box shopping.

What you really want to do is collapse in front of the TV and watch an NCIS or Downton Abbey or Big Bang Marathon or read the library book that is due back Tuesday. What you really want to do is just tear open a bag of chips or make yourself a cup of tea and cookies and not think about anything productive at all.

If you have reached that moment when nothing else seems possible, and your TV or your book or the movie you downloaded exercise irresistible temptation, give in.

Just do it. Watch six hours of the teams we all wish we belonged to, be they the detectives at NCIS or the aristocrats around the dining table or the geeky comic book devotees at a California university. Read the latest from Charlaine Harris or the Jack Reacher thriller or a brain-eating Zombie fantasia. Go through all the Oscar nominees and scornfully dismiss them one by one.

Sometimes your brain needs a break. Even more often, your body needs a break. Being Americans, we have all read self-help books on how to manage and schedule and prioritize our time, on how to organize our lives, on what is urgent and important, or urgent and not important, or barely worth thinking about—and once in a while, we have to throw it all out the door.

Take the day off. Indulge. Let yourself.

Indulge

Here’s betting that by 10 o’clock Sunday morning (or maybe 11 o’clock Sunday night), you’ll be ready for something a bit different, and that those task lists and chores will seem a little less overwhelming—or at least look like something you can postpone for another week. And that having spent a day actually off, you might want to spend at least a few hours of one writing or painting or heading off to film the polar bears enjoying the weather no one else is enjoying.

It’s your time. It’s your life. Every minute of it isn’t going to be spend fiercely engaged with the struggle to create. Some of it is going to be spent munching snacks and watching TV. And it is my belief that ultimately your creative projects will benefit by the downtime.

Thanks to Eric Ember for permission to use his photos.

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3 Responses to The Saturday Collapse

  1. I agree whole-heartedly! I blogged about this, too – this past week. “Downtime is a must – if I don’t schedule it I WILL take it anyways. Comparison is always dangerous and foolish. My energy levels are different than the other people I know. At 47 – I know myself. I know what I need and I don’t need to feel bad about it. I can be gentle with myself. I feel more whole when I’ve had my kind of downtime – it’s healthy for me and I want it to be part of my health regimen. Note to self ~ It is not lazy. If I want to my book to move forward – I must schedule in downtime. Downtime will always come first. When I’ve had my downtime, my book time will be oh-so productive and energizing. “

  2. Ruth Washton says:

    This is exactly how I felt yesterday. And I gave into it. I reduced my “to do” list to what was absolutely essential, went to the gym, and took a nap. Today I am feeling refreshed, my body and mind are calm, and I feel ready, even eager, to tackle things again.

    • deborahatherton says:

      Giving in to it is just what we have to do sometimes. I like the idea of reducing “to do” to absolute essentials–sometimes I call it “the least I can do!”

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